Tag Archives: Mister Rogers

Red Sweaters

We don’t feature Children’s stuff on here often (check out our friends at Story Pockets!) but every now and then, something comes along that we just can’t pass up.

As some of you may know, a few years ago the wonderful folks at the Fred Rogers Company developed a new show featuring the next generation of friends from Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood. I’ve seen a few episodes with my niece and nephew, and it is just as great as you’d expect.

In an upcoming episode of the adorable Daniel Tiger’s Neighborhood, one of the Red Sweater Kids pays a visit to the Carnegie Library to sign up for their first card. The Sweater Kids are featured at the end of each episode – exploring their Pittsburgh neighborhoods and interacting with neighbors in the same way that Fred Rogers did on the original Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood.

source: fredrogers.org

Good news – a few of our branches will be screening a preview of this special episode and will have some crafts on hand to enjoy after.

Saturday, November 14 (tomorrow!) at 11:00 am – Beechview

Saturday, November 28 at 11:00 am – Woods Run

Thursday, December 3 at 11:00 am – Mt. Washington

Friday, December 4 at 9:30 am – Downtown & Business

Wednesday, December 16 at 6:30 pm – Lawrenceville 

Saturday, December 19 at 10:30 am – West End 

So pull out your best red sweater and join us for some fun!

— Jess

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Neighborly

Right now I live next door to a building that used to house a business.  Said business relocated to a different neighborhood, which is sad for those of us who liked to shop there.  However, it does create the delightful state of affairs in which I can now describe where I live in terms of something that used to be there (and it wasn’t an Isaly’s).  This makes me feel as if, after thirteen years of city living, I am a bona fide Pittsburgher at last.

I’ve loved every moment of my time here thus far, especially getting to know all the wonderful people.  Pittsburghers are just like their iconic spokesman, Mister Rogers:  friendly folks who start conversations on buses, cheerfully perform random acts of kindness , and of course,  give helpful directions.

Feel like being part of — or even more of a part of — Pittsburgh’s neighborly phenomenon?  Next time you stop by Main Library, please consider supporting our colleagues in the Children’s Department by contributing to their latest Rogersian effort.  Between now and April 16 you can support the Mommy & Me Food Drive, which benefits our friends and neighbors at Community Human Services, by bringing a low-sugar, non-perishable food item with you next time you visit.  We always love to see you when you come in, but we’ll be super-excited if you choose to support the library and the Oakland community in this way, at this time.

My own Pittsburgh story is, I’m sure, just beginning, and I can’t wait to see what the chapters ahead reveal.  All I know for certain is that it will never be boring!  Not with wonderful friends and neighbors like you.

–Leigh Anne

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Banned Books: the Top Ten Most Disturbing Novels (and more)

Continuing in the spirit of this year’s recent Banned Books Week event here at the library, submitted for your approval and/or disapproval is a list, in ascending order, of the Top Ten Most Disturbing Novels, as compiled by The List Universe.

  • Justine by the Marquis de Sade

I’m happy, in a disturbed kind of way, to say the library has 9 out of 10 of the novels available for circulation; the one that is currently unavailable (and can be obtained via Interlibrary Loan) is in the process of being replaced.

Of course, one’s definition of disturbing may significantly vary from more traditional definitions. Some find Theodore Dreiser or Lewis Carroll or Oprah Winfrey or even Pittsburgh’s beloved Mr. Rogers a bit unsettling. Whatever your cup of meat, as the poet said, it’s all a matter of taste, or a decided lack thereof.

So, did The List Universe pick the right 10 disturbing novels? Are there any other more disturbing novels or ones on the list that shouldn’t be there at all?

For my money, Joyce Carol Oates’s The Rise of Life on Earth ranks right up there with the most disturbing novels I’ve ever read. Suffice it to say that if you like clinical detail in your discomposing prose, this may be just the ticket. Or perhaps evil spawn is more up your street. In that case, Doris Lessing’s The Fifth Child might disturb you all night long. They both did me in, in compellingly different ways.

While pondering these deep philosophical questions, one thing you may be assured of: when it comes to banned and disturbing books, the library will proudly defend your right to read and enjoy them (or not).

Perhaps this is all a bit too disquieting and you’d much rather go for a laid-back kind of vibe. The following should do the trick. Be forewarned, however; there are some folks that find this type of thing unsettling, indeed.

– Don

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It’s a Beautiful Day

 Fred Rogers would have been eighty years old last week. Pittsburgh’s “Won’t You Be My Neighbor?” Days celebrates his legacy, especially what it means to be a caring neighbor.  

Pittsburgh is a city of neighborhoods. With 88 geographically distinct domaines, how could it be otherwise? (And to know that it’s the topography and/or geography that is responsible for the burgh’s hoods, just think of how many named areas there are in Pittsburgh that have one of these words in them: Wood, Woods, Land, Field, Glen, Park, Vale, and – Pittsburgh’s favorite – Hill.)

But to me Pittsburgh is a city of neighbors. My sense of Pittsburgh hospitality began the day my husband and I pulled our rental truck up to the curb, unfolded our cramped limbs and unlocked the door of our rental house. Strangers who lived nearby offered to help move heavy furniture and feed us dinner. By the time we’d unloaded our possessions we were too tired for dinner, but that night as we fell asleep we knew the names of our four nearest neighbors and wondered if we’d landed in Mister Rogers’ actual neighborhood.

The neighborhood’s real life cast of characters included a chatty corner crossing guard, the reliable postal deliverer (“Hi, I’m Bill and I’ll be bringing your mail!”), and the furnace repair man who, at his second house call, nodded at my husband and punched me on the arm with a “how yinz doin’?”

My goal as librarian at CLP is to be another purveyor of this Pittsburgh hospitality. I like to think of myself as one of Mister Rogers’ neighbors.

The First Floor – New and Featured Department will remember Mr. Rogers  by hosting two events in April.

I’m Proud of You: My Friendship with Fred Rogers , by Tim Madigan, is this year’s One Book One Community  program selection. A discussion focusing on this book will be held on the First Floor, Tuesday, April 22, 1:00 – 2:00 PM, with a second session from 6:00 – 7:00 PM.

Saturday, April 26, 2:00 – 5:00 PM, join us on the First Floor for Celebrate Oakland!: A One Book One Community Event. Find out what makes Oakland so special in “Something About Oakland,” a documentary film by Rick Sebak. It’s part of the Pittsburgh History Series  produced for WQED. Afterwards, meet Mr. Sebak and enjoy a neighborhood open house with light refreshments.

Please won’t you be my neighbor?

–Julie

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