By George: Georgian Era Historical Romance

As a student of the works and life of Jane Austen and devotee of historical romance, my favorite time period is the Regency era, which roughly falls between 1811 and 1820, when King George III’s son, the Prince of Wales, took over the throne for a time due to his father’s madness. Dubbed the Prince Regent, he was a flamboyant and gaudy personality, and thus the Regency era was born.

But to be honest, I’ll read almost any historical romance if it’s a good story, is well written, and set in England. Except medieval. I do like the etiquette, civilities, and genteel manners of a polite society.

Read on for some recommended Georgian era romances (1714-1830) that I’ve greatly enjoyed.

Maiden Lane series by Elizabeth Hoyt

Set in the London neighborhood of St. Giles in the 1730s, this is a gritty, dark, and dangerous series. It’s also breathtakingly romantic. Throughout the series, there is a running thread about the Ghost of St. Giles, a sort of Batman figure who saves the good people of St. Giles from peril. Passionate, raw, and real.

Wylder Sisters series by Isabella Bradford

This is the nice and elegant side of Georgian society. Three aristocratic and very wealthy but very sheltered sisters must marry for duty but are hoping to marry for love instead. This was a period in history when romantic love was just beginning to influence the choice of a marriage partner rather than as a mere business alliance between two families. Isabella Bradford is a pseudonym for historical fiction writer Susan Holloway Scott.

A Gentleman ‘Til Midnight, A Promise by Daylight, A Wedding by Dawn by Alison DeLaine

Though these books do not have an official series name, they are all connected by recurring characters. The series features strong and independent women including a female pirate, a medic, and the female equivalent of a lady’s man; I guess that would be a gentleman’s lady?

Desperate Duchesses series by Eloisa James

This sparkling and witty series by Shakespearean professor Eloisa James–and also the daughter of poet Robert Bly–is more about social manners and mores in Georgian England rather than true historical romance. The descriptions of the intricacies of ton society, the elaborate headgear and fashions, and the daily life of privilege and wealth in the very upper class is vividly brought to life in a very snappy and snarky way.

-Maria A.


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4 responses to “By George: Georgian Era Historical Romance

  1. Elaine

    Hi, Maria,

    I, too, have a Regency romance addiction, so thanks for feeding it!

    Although I have read most of these authors, I’m not familiar with Isabella Bradford, so I’ll have to check her out. It’s always nice to find a new author to enjoy.

    One of my favourite authors is Julie Anne Long, who created the Pennyroyal Green series. The stories alternate between two families from the same small village who have been enemies for decades. Beautifully written, great characters and chock full of emotion.

    Also, in the New Year, keep your eye out for the debut historical from Jenny Holiday, a former colleague of mine who is a wonderful writer.

    Thanks again for sharing your favourites.


  2. Oh, I love a good historical fiction!

    • Maria will be thrilled to hear that! Do you have any favorite books/authors you’d recommend?

      Leigh Anne

      • Everything by Phillippa Gregory is a favourite of mine. I have two that I’ve just added to my TBR list that came highly recommended: Kings and Queens by Terry Tyler which is the story of Henry VIII and his wives set in modern times and The Gilded Lily set in England 1660 about 2 housemaids who run away to London.

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