A View to A Kick

Everyone has their limits. But limits exist to be tested, yes?

Normally I draw the line at fiction that contains child abuse as a plot point. There’s quite enough of that in real life, thank you. And while it means I miss out on some mysteries and thrillers, it also means I don’t have horrible nightmares, either.

So when I picked up Chelsea Cain’s new novel, One Kick, I almost put it right back down. Missing children, child pornographers? No thank you.

And yet.

The first chapter of One Kick is, hands down, the best story-starter I’ve read in a long time. When the FBI swoops in to capture a long-hunted suspect, they don’t expect to find one of his victims there for rescue. But there she is, Kick Lannigan, whose videos are among the most popular with internet predators. Confused beyond belief, and firmly in the grip of Stockholm Syndrome, Kick makes a decision that she’ll eventually regret, one that will lead her to a life of vigilante crime-fighting, in the hopes of atoning for her own guilt. My jaw practically fell to the floor as the scene unspooled, and I realized what was going to happen (Ever yell at a character? This is definitely one of those thrillers).

Flash forward to Kick’s wobbly adult life, with only her dog, Monster, and a fellow abuse survivor, James, for company (her family ties are…complicated). She’s a lean, mean, pervert-busting machine, armed to the teeth and maxed out with physical combat skills to boot. Still, when a mysterious man named Bishop shows up on her doorstep and asks for her help finding yet another missing child, Kick is understandably wary. A man of few words, with his own painful past to protect, Bishop gains Kick’s begrudging respect (trust is a bit much to ask), and the unlikely team springs into action. Given, however, that it’s also the tenth anniversary of her own rescue, it’s questionable whether Kick can hold it together, especially when the past and the present smash together in an ugly tangle of revelations.

Author photo and book cover

Photo courtesy of OregonLive. Click through to read a news article on Cain.


Characterization is definitely the novel’s chief selling point. I’ve never run across a protagonist quite like Kick. She’s flawed, obviously, but what’s really compelling is that she’s flawed despite her best efforts to become whole. She’s tried therapy, meditation, kava-kava, positive mantras, emancipation from her over-controlling mother (who exploits her “victim mom” status in a way that made me want to slap her silly), and a whole host of other healing and coping techniques. She’s also taken lessons in just about every confidence-boosting, self-protective art under the sun (Kick is awfully fond of her Glock)..and yet, she’s still just barely hanging on by a thread. As you barrel through her adventures, you want her to win so badly, to get some measure of peace, respite, justice.

Instead, she gets Bishop…which might be almost the next best thing, given that they have an awful lot in common (with the exception of Bishop’s dislike of firearms). Not in that “here comes the big strong man to make it all better” kind of way. More like the “here’s somebody who knows what it’s like to hurt” kind of way. They say there’s somebody out there for everybody; is it possible Bishop is the one for Kick? Or is he just using her the way so many other people in her life already have?

I suppose we’ll have to wait until the next book in the series to find out. Yes, this is the first of a projected series, which puts me in the tooth-gnashing position of looking for something else as exciting to read while I wait. Luckily, Cain’s Archie Sheridan and Gretchen Lowell series is hanging around the library system just begging for some comparison/contrast. And Confessions of a Teen Sleuth looks pretty amusing, to boot.

Where do your limits lie, constant readers? Is there any kind of book or subject material you just cannot even? Or are you fearless in your pursuit of fiction?

–Leigh Anne

with apologies to James Bond and Duran Duran


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5 responses to “A View to A Kick

  1. I will rarely decide not to read a book because of it’s content. The whole Trigger Warning debate was something i read with interest and i decided that this stuff happens. I can’t ignore it, i can’t pretend to sit ignorant to it. Fiction that deals with very real atrocities is what gets society talking about it, looking for it, and trying to help prevent further instances of it happening. Acknowledging things that happen to others and finding the passion to want to help is important to me. So is finding out what triggers me and what in my past has caused that, so that i can make sure that I am in the best place possible too. To make sure that i don’t end up in those horrible situations through vulnerability, naivety or whatever it is that results in us finding ourselves in compromising positions.

    • I’m really glad that works for you to engage with the things that trouble you. Fiction can definitely be a healing thing – maybe Kick should try some bibliotherapy?

      But: thank you for your well-put, well-argued comment. I hope all the books you pick up are exactly what you need them to be.

      Leigh Anne

  2. Sheila

    Try Karen Slaughter’s Cop Town with 2 female police officers in 1970s Atlanta who try to solve a fellow officer’s death amid all of the prejudice (you name a type and it’s found in this book) brutality and incivility of this era for another exciting book to read.
    Books I can’t read – where the main character dies in the end. Yes, I do always look at the last page…and have since I was 12 years old. I have no idea how I made it through Cold Mountain.

    • Requesting it now – thanks Sheila!!

      Oh wow. Much respect for finishing Cold Mountain. Um, just in case you hadn’t guessed, don’t pick up a certain popular YA novel by a Mr. John Green….

      Leigh Anne

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